War for the Web

‘Censorship’

30 09.13

Snowden, the NSA, and the ITU

There's been a lot of uproar over the last few months since Snowden's disclosures about the NSA's unprecedented surveillance of the Internet at large; and the consequences have been incredibly damaging for US interests both at home and abroad. The NSA's reckless actions will have two sets of distinct long-term consequences for American business and the Internet at large. Read more
 
25 09.13

Wifi (in)security

It came out a few weeks ago that Google, the benevolent giant, has access to all the wireless passwords stored on Android devices. For the uninitiated, let me explain how this works. Read more
 
23 09.13

Taken Down

Piracy is a big issue, there's no doubt about it. Certainly with Hollywood blockbusters flopping all summer, there's more concern than ever about pirated TV content, movies, and music eating into the profits of the studios and record labels. Read more
 
16 09.13

The War for the Web is heating up

When we, as filmmakers, talk about the War for the Web, we are not talking about some abstract battle taking place, but about real battles taking place behind closed doors. The latest update on that front is the FCC and Verizon court case taking place now, which will determine whether the FCC can regulate the Internet, and by the same token, whether Verizon has the right to restrict access to its customers based on how much content providers are willing to pay. Read more
 
30 03.13

Internet (In)security

So last week there's been a whole hubbub about how a DDOS attack in Northern Europe is bringing down the whole Internet. We should be clear on something; the Internet is fine. Now, that doesn't mean it's not troubling. DDOS attacks happen all the time, but this DDOS attack is roughly 6 times larger than any we've really seen previously, and there are some Internet outtages in Northern Europe. All that said, Gizmodo has a really great explanation of what's really going on, which you can check out here. Read more
 
28 03.13

Battlefield Internet

We often get asked, what is War for the Web about. We have a really good elevator pitch down about the physical infrastructure of the Internet, and the way that ownership works, etc... We can rattle it off no problem. And those are all great descriptions of the film, but they aren't what the film is about. Read more
 
05 02.13

War on the Internet

In the last month there have been some startling admissions from several newspapers that their newsrooms have been the target of malicious hacking activities over the last six months. It started with the New York Times own admission of being hacked, and their description of the way they confronted this dilemma. Since then, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post have both acknowledged their own issues with hacking, and it looks as though Bloomberg is having some trouble as well. It looks like the hacking has been done from China, and the timing of the hacks coincide with the publication of a series of articles about the top leadership in China and their families by both the Times and the Wall Street Journal. Mandiant, the computer security group that the Times hired, has even gone so far as to suggest that it was the Chinese military coordinating these attacks. Read more
 
06 12.12

Happy Birthday to the ARPAnet

The ARPAnet, the precursor to our modern Internet, came into existence today when a group of students at UCLA sent the message, L - O before the computer crashed. The modern computer network was born! While we are here, let's just mention that ARPA was a project entirely funded by the defense department, and that it's success and importance became quickly apparent. From its inception in the 1960's to the explosion of the Internet in the consumer marketplace in the 1990's, there was a continual expansion of Internet and networking for businesses and academic institutions. Definitely check out wikipedia's history for more information. Read more
 
18 11.12

This week in Internets

A lot happened this week. We can't recap all of it in detail but there are a few stories to pay attention to: Most recently, Anonymous claims to have hacked a whole boatload of Israeli websites, including some government sites. They also claim to have deleted data from government databases. There's no doubt that these sites and databases where backed up, so there was probably no lasting damage done, but none-the-less, I'm sure it served as an annoyance if not worse. Read more
 
03 10.12

Deep Packet Inspection – You live in public.

We normally associate DPI with highly controlled totalitarian regimes, but the fact is DPI is used almost everywhere. In the United Kingdom, DPI was used in the run up to the Olympics to monitor traffic for threats. Since then, a law has been proposed that would ask ISPs to retain user information -- IP logs, emails, correspondence -- for a year. It isn't any better here in the United States. Most ISPs already use some kind of DPI technology to prevent malware attacks and spam, but what they track and keep is set to increase. Read more